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The church of Saint-Pierre

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Heritage
Location type: Heritage
Number of texts: 1
3 stars
Made by Wizpr.guide | Reference Wizpr.guide | © All rights reserved
Made by Wizpr.guide | © All rights reserved

 
The church of  Saint-Pierre d’Hastière-par-delà, formerly the priory church of Notre-Dame, is part of a Benedictine abbey founded in the 10th century (around 900) by Wigéric, count of Bigdau. United in  969 with Waulsort abbey, it was relegated to the rank of a priory.
The Roman abbey church was built in 1033-1035 by abbot Rodolphe. It was then enlarged and extended to the east. This work meant destroying the chancel and four additional bays were added in the Gothic style. Under abbot Allard de Hierges (1260-1264), the building was given a chancel and apse. The abbotship was abolished in the French Revolution and endured significant damage. It was subsequently restored between 1882 and 1909 by the architect A. Van Assche and the building became a parish church at the beginning of the 20th century (1912). It was restored once again following damage suffered during the Second World War. The façade has a doorway with lintel dating from the 13th century, topped by a massive tower on four levels adjoining a stair turret to the north. The nave is made up of five bays. It is flanked by two side aisles under sloping roofs. Lit by high arched windows, the nave is characterised by large blind arcatures that are also arched.
The transept is prominent and low. It separates the nave and the later extension, a second Gothic nave with three aisles and four bays that replaced the Roman chancel. The Gothic chancel  features one bay ending in a chevet with three walls. It is lit by lancet windows under a small round window. The building has a slate roof and pinnacle above the crossing. The pinnacle is square, with an octagonal spire. Note the 13th-century stalls (chancel), the statuary that includes in particular works by Lambert Lombard, as well as the crypt that houses Merovingian sarcophaguses.
Listed (14-04-1942)
 

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