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Edersee dam

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Dam
Location type: Dam
Location address: Deutschland, Waldeck-Frankenberg, Edertal
Number of texts: 3
3 stars
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Greenshed | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

The Edersee Dam is a hydroelectric dam spanning the Eder river in northern Hesse, Germany. Constructed between 1908 and 1914, it lies near the small town of Waldeck at the northern edge of the Kellerwald. Breached by Allied bombs during World War II, it was rebuilt during the war, and today generates hydroelectric power and regulates water levels for shipping on the Weser river.

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Made by Dromos

In World War II, the Edersee dam was as part of Operation Chastise, destroyed by special bouncing bombs dropped by British Lancaster bombers of No. 617 Squadron RAF in the early morning of May 17, 1943, creating massive destruction and loss of life downstream. Through the breach in the dam, 70 meters wide and 22 meters deep, water emptied at the rate of 8,000 m³ per second into the narrow valley below, a total of about 160 million m³. A flood wave of 6-8 meters in height roared through the river valley as far as 30 km downstream, before it diminished in the widening floodplains of the lower Eder, the Fulda and the Weser. About 70 people perished[1] (some non-German sources erroneously cite[2] an early total of 749 for all foreigners perished in all POW and labour camps downriver of the Möhne dam as the casualty at supposed POW or labour camp just below the Eder Dam.)
The dam was rebuilt within months by forced labor drawn from the construction of the Atlantic Wall under the command of Organisation Todt, and the lake today is a major summertime recreational facility. Its capacity of 199.3 million m³ makes it the third largest reservoir in Germany.

The 1954 film, The Dam Busters chronicled the British attack on the dam.

This location and event is also used in the popular PC game Call of Duty, where the dam is rebuilt and the player, a British Special Forces agent, must sabotage AA guns on the dam during the summer of 1944. This, however, is highly fictional, because the dam was never attacked after 1943.

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Made by Sandra72

The Edersee Dam is a hydroelectric dam constructed between 1908 to 1914 across the Eder river, near the small town of Waldeck in northern Hesse, Germany, it lies at the northern edge of the Kellerwald. The dam is primarily used hydroelectric power generation and to regulate water levels for shipping on the Weser river.

In World War II, the dam was as part of Operation Chastise, destroyed by special bouncing bombs dropped by British Lancaster bombers of No. 617 Squadron RAF in the early morning of May 17, 1943, creating massive destruction and loss of life downstream. Through the breach in the dam, 70 metres (230 ft) wide and 22 metres (72 ft) deep, water emptied at the rate of 8,000 cubic metres per second (280,000 cu ft/s) into the narrow valley below, a total of about 160 hm³. A flood wave of 6–8 metres (20–26 ft) in height roared through the river valley as far as 30 kilometres (19 mi) downstream, before it diminished in the widening floodplains of the lower Eder, the Fulda and the Weser. About 70 people died[1] (some non-German sources erroneously cite[2] an early total of 749 for all foreigners killed in all POW and labor camps downriver of the Möhne dam as casualties at a supposed POW or labor camp just below the Eder Dam.)

The dam was rebuilt within months by forced labor drawn from the construction of the Atlantic Wall under the command of Organisation Todt, and the lake today is a major summertime recreational facility. Its capacity of 199,300 cubic metres (260,700 cu yd) makes it the third largest reservoir in Germany.

At low water, in late summers of dry years, the remnants of three villages (Asel, Bringhausen, and Berich), along with a bridge across the original river bed, that were submerged when the lake was filled in 1914, can be seen, and descendants of people buried in the now submerged cemeteries go to visit the graves of their ancestors.

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