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Ildefons Cerdà

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POI
Location type: POI
Location address: España, Barcelona
Number of texts: 2
3 stars
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Josep Maria 15. | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

Ildefons Cerdà is a station in the Barcelona Metro network, served by FGC-operated L8, among other Rodalies Barcelona and FGC suburban lines. It’s not properly in Plaça d’Ildefons Cerdà (a square in the Sants-Montjuïc district of Barcelona proper, but just next to L’Hospitalet de Llobregat) but in the L’Hospitalet part of Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes. It was built in 1987. It’s also due to become part of future L10.

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Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Florencia Giordano | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

Plaça d’Ildefons Cerdà (often known simply as Plaça Cerdà) is a square in Barcelona, part of La Bordeta, in the Sants-Montjuïc district, very close to the boundary of the municipality of L’Hospitalet de Llobregat. It’s named after the city’s renowned urban planner Ildefons Cerdà. It is essentially a large roundabout which connects different parts of the city. The new courts of Barcelona and L’Hospitalet de Llobregat, collectively known under the name Ciutat de la Justícia are located in the immediacy of this square. Recent redevelopment has changed the area’s feel, as well as promotion of the different Fira de Barcelona venues, not far from the square. Decisions made by recent urbanists has been criticised as a place hostile to strollers and therefore quite different from the idea of Barcelona an urbanist like Ildefons Cerdà had. A monument to Cerdà by sculptor Antoni Riera Clavillé was inaugurated in 1959, one century after his original urban plan, but was removed shortly after General Jorge Vigón, the Francoist Minister of Public Works, dismissed it publicly. Ironically, there isn’t a single name plate in the square, which makes it theoretically a nameless space.

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