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Monte Zoncolan

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Mountain Peak
Location type: Mountain Peak
Location address: Ovaro
Number of texts: 5
5 stars
Made by Dromos
Made by Dromos

Monte Zoncolan is one of the most demanding climbs in professional road bicycle racing, having been used in the Giro d’Italia four times (2003, 2007, 2010, 2011) and the Giro Donne once (1997). The mountain can be climbed on three roads: one from Ovaro, another from Sutrio, and a third from Priola. The most demanding climb is west from Ovaro. This is a very, and one of the most difficult in Europe, usually compared to the Alto de El Angliru.

Linked characteristics: Did you know...
Linked themes: Cycling classics, Climbs & cols for cyclists
Linked groups: Wielerlegendes

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Made by Dromos | Reference Opera propria
Made by Dromos | Reference Daniel Friebe, 2011, Mountain High, Veltman Uitgevers

Did you know that the climb tot Monte Zoncolan became part of the Giro in 2003. They called the climb the “Pink Dragon”. A lot of cyclists were not happy with this monster. Mario Cipollini used a mountainbike to climb the mountain as sign of protest and maybe also a bit a s publicity.

Linked characteristics: Did you know...
Linked groups: Wielerlegendes

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Made by Dromos | Reference Pubblico dominio
Made by Dromos

Did you know that the Zoncolan is also used in Italian political expressions. If politicians had had a huge backlog in the polls, they still had to climb a Zoncolan.

Linked characteristics: Did you know..., Peculiar

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Made by BillieTurf

The mountain can be climbed on three roads: one from Ovaro, another from Sutrio, and a third from Priola.

West from Ovaro: This is a very demanding climb, and one of the most difficult in Europe, usually compared to the Alto de El Angliru. It was featured for the first time in the 2007 Giro d’Italia. The climb starts in Ovaro in the Gorto valley, and is 10.1 kilometres (6.3 mi) long at an average of 11.9% with an elevation gain of 1,210 metres (3,970 ft) and a maximum gradient of 22%. The real climb however starts at Liariis, 8.5 kilometres (5.3 mi) from the summit. Shortly after the village, the road disappears into forest and gains 900 metres (3,000 ft) in the next 6 kilometres (3.7 mi). After this section, the road passes through three short tunnels, before a series of steep switchbacks immediately beneath the summit. The former rough asphalt between Liariis and the tunnels was replaced in 2007; that between the last tunnel and the summit had already been resurfaced by autumn 2005. The tunnels are now lit.

East from Sutrio: This route is less demanding than the road from Ovaro but it is also one of Italy’s most challenging climbs. It was featured for the first time in the 1997 Giro Donne and later in the 2003 Giro d’Italia. The actual climb to the summit starts at Sutrio and is 13.5 kilometres (8.4 mi) long at an average of 9% with an elevation gain of 1,210 metres (3,970 ft) and a maximum gradient being 23%. The first 8.7 kilometres (5.4 mi) have an average gradient of 8.7%, followed by a false flat after this section. The most demanding section is the final 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi) with an average gradient of 13% and the initial part of the final kilometre at 22% grade.[3][4]


East from Priola: This is the original old road which was replaced by the newer road from Sutrio described above. The two roads combine around 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) below the summit. The road from Priola was first asphalted in autumn 2005. From bottom to top, the 8.9 kilometres (5.5 mi) long road gains an astonishing 1,140 metres (3,740 ft), meaning an average gradient of 12.8%. The lower part has sharp hairpin bends and is at times very steep. The climb is briefly flat after merging with the newer road, with the remaining 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi) containing several ramps of up to 23% steepness.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Io-IIZrA8Bk

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