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Ara Pacis Augustae

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Monument
Location type: Monument
Location address: Rome
Number of texts: 4
4 stars
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Manfred Heyde | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

The Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, “Altar of Augustan Peace”; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar in Rome dedicated to Pax, the Roman goddess of Peace. The monument was commissioned by the Roman Senate on July 4, 13 BC to honor the return of Augustus to Rome after three years in Hispania and Gaul, and consecrated on January 30, 9 BC. The altar reflects the Augustan vision of Roman civil religion. It is comprised of a traditional open-air altar at its center surrounded by precinct walls which are pierced on the eastern and western ends by openings. The Ara Pacis is perhaps best known for the decoration on the exterior of the precinct walls composed of two tiers of friezes. On the north and south, the upper register depicts the procession of members of the Imperial household and the larger regime, while on the east and west, panels depict allegorical themes of peace and Roman civic ritual. The lower register of the frieze depicts vegetal work meant to communicate the abundance and prosperity of the (Latin: Pax Augusta). The monument as a whole serves a civic ritual function whilst simultaneous operating as propaganda for Augustus and his regime, easing notions of autocracy and dynastic succession that might otherwise be unpalatable to traditional Roman culture.

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Made by est2000 | Reference Wikimedia
Made by est2000

The Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, “Altar of Augustan Peace”; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar to Peace, envisioned as a Roman goddess. It was commissioned by the Roman Senate on 4 July 13 BC to honor the triumphal return from Hispania and Gaul of the Roman emperor Augustus,[1] and was consecrated on 30 January 9 BC by the Senate to celebrate the peace established in the Empire after Augustus’s victories.[2] The altar was meant to be a vision of the Roman civil religion. It sought to portray the peace and fertile prosperity enjoyed as a result of the Pax Augusta (Latin, “Augustan peace”) brought about by the military supremacy of the Roman empire, and act as a visual reminder of the Julio-Claudian dynasty that was bringing it about.

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Made by est2000 | Reference Wikimedia
Made by est2000

The Ara Pacis Augustae (Latin, “Altar of Augustan Peace”; commonly shortened to Ara Pacis) is an altar to Peace, envisioned as a Roman goddess. It was commissioned by the Roman Senate on 4 July 13 BC to honor the triumphal return from Hispania and Gaul of the Roman emperor Augustus, and was consecrated on 30 January 9 BC by the Senate to celebrate the peace established in the Empire after Augustus’s victories.

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Made by booking.com | Reference Booking.com | © All rights reserved
Made by booking.com | Reference Booking.com | © All rights reserved

From: 51.75 EUR
Hotel Rooms: 3

Set on the banks of the Tiber River, Ara Pacis Augustae is located between Piazza del Popolo and Vatican City. The air-conditioned rooms have a modern design, and Wi-Fi is free at reception.

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