This site uses cookies to improve your experience and the quality of our services. By using this site you agree to its use of cookies. More information Hide

Paleis op de Dam

Need a hotel nearby?

Sponsored links

Routes nearby

Places of Interest nearby

Matched content

Hotels nearby

Restaurants nearby

Sponsored links

🔎
Palace
Location type: Palace
Location address: Amsterdam
Number of texts: 4
4 stars
Made by DromosReference
Made by Dromos

Sculpturer Artus Quellinus from Antwerp made in 1654 Caryatids for the courthouse of the townhall of Amsterdam, currently the Palace on the Dam.  The symbol of the Caryatids goes back to a story in ancient Greece.

The town of Karyes in Greece chose the side of Persia during the war between Greece and Persia in the 5th century B.C. After the victory over Persia in Marathon, the Greeks took revenge against Karyes. They killed all the men and sold the women as slaves. Later on, Greek architects used the women of Karyes as decorative supports symbolising the slavery. Since the 4th century B.C., these were names Caryatids. The most famous example is the Erechtheion on the Acropolis of Athens.

Classify this POI
Link to route

Made by ShitFaceFart
Made by ShitFaceFart

The Royal Palace in Amsterdam (Dutch: Koninklijk Paleis Amsterdam or Paleis op de Dam) is one of three palaces in the Netherlands which are at the disposal of the monarch by Act of Parliament.
The palace was built as a city hall during the Dutch Golden Age in the 17th century. The building became the royal palace of King Louis Napoleon and later of the Dutch Royal House. It is situated on the west side of Dam Square in the centre of Amsterdam, opposite the War Memorial and next to the Nieuwe Kerk.

Classify this POI
Link to route

Made by Brommer75

Sculpturer Artus Quellinus from Antwerp made in 1654 Caryatids for the courthouse of the townhall of Amsterdam, currently the Palace on the Dam.  The symbol of the Caryatids goes back to a story in ancient Greece.

The town of Karyes in Greece chose the side of Persia during the war between Greece and Persia in the 5th century B.C. After the victory over Persia in Marathon, the Greeks took revenge against Karyes. They killed all the men and sold the women as slaves. Later on, Greek architects used the women of Karyes as decorative supports symbolising the slavery. Since the 4th century B.C., these were names Caryatids. The most famous example is the Erechtheion on the Acropolis of Athens.

Author: Dromos

More information

Classify this POI
Link to route

Made by Jwc Jwc

Gegevens uit Google Maps-lt;br>Dam, Amsterdam, Nederland-lt;br>www.paleisamsterdam.nl-lt;br>+31 20 522 6161

Classify this POI
Link to route

Comments

Add comment