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Siege of Namur

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City
Location type: City
Location address: België, Namen
Number of texts: 3
4 stars
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Trzęsacz | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

The Siege of Namur, 25 May–30 June 1692, was a major engagement of the Nine Years’ War, and was part of the French grand plan (devised over the winter of 1691–92) to defeat the forces of the Grand Alliance and bring a swift conclusion to the war. Namur, sitting on the confluence of the Meuse and Sambre rivers, was a considerable fortress, and was a significant political and military asset. French forces, guided by Vauban, forced the town’s surrender on 5 June, but the citadel, staunchly defended by Menno van Coehoorn, managed to hold on until 30 June before capitulating, bringing an end to the 36-day siege. Concerned that King William III planned to recapture the stronghold, King Louis XIV subsequently ordered his commander-in-chief, the duc de Luxembourg, to join battle with the Allies in the field, resulting in the bloody Battle of Steenkerque on 3 August.

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Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Jaybear | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

The Siege of Namur (French: Siège de Namur) was a battle between Belgian and German forces around the fortified city of Namur during World War I. Namur was defended by a ring of modern fortresses, known as the Fortified Position of Namur and guarded by the Belgian 4th Division. When the siege began on 20 August, the German forces used experience gained at the Battle of Liège (4–16 August) and bombarded the forts using German super-heavy siege artillery and four batteries on loan from Austria-Hungary, before attacking with infantry. The French army was defeated at the Battle of Charleroi and managed to pass only one regiment into Namur as a reinforcement. The forts were destroyed by the bombardment, some being demolished by conventional heavy artillery rather than the siege guns, due to flaws in the concrete protection encasing the forts. The last of the Belgian fortress troops were forced to surrender on 25 August, after the survivors of the Belgian 4th Division had withdrawn to the south through the French Fifth Army and eventually joined the Belgian field army at Antwerp during the siege.

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Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Machahn | © CC 3.0
Made by wikipedia.org | Reference Wikipedia.org | © CC 3.0

The Siege of Namur, 2 July – 1 September 1695, was the second siege of the city of Namur in the Nine Years’ War. The Allied forces of the Grand Alliance retook the city from the French, who had captured it in the first siege in 1692. The recapture of Namur has been called the most important event in the Nine Years’ War.

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